Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Evening Prayer for May 5

 

May 5 2021

Evening Prayer (Vespers)

You may wish to light a candle and place it before you as you begin.

 

OPENING DIALOGUE

Answer us when we call, O God.
Be gracious to us and hear our prayer.
When we are in distress, you make space for us.
You put gladness in our hearts,
as with a fine feast.
When we are disturbed, may we not sin,
but ponder things on our beds, and be silent.
We will lie down and sleep in peace.
For you alone, O Lord, make us lie down
in safety.

HYMN: We Walk by Faith and Not by Sight

YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hk_7EUvwv8&ab_channel=DecemberSnow1231

READINGS

FIRST READING: Isaiah 65:17-25

A reading from Isaiah

Look! I’m creating a new heaven and a new earth:
    
past events won’t be remembered;
    
they won’t come to mind.
18 Be glad and rejoice forever
    
in what I’m creating,
    
because I’m creating Jerusalem as a joy
    
and her people as a source of gladness.
19 I will rejoice in Jerusalem and be glad about my people.
    
No one will ever hear the sound of weeping or crying in it again.
20 No more will babies live only a few days,
    
or the old fail to live out their days.
The one who dies at a hundred will be like a young person,
    
and the one falling short of a hundred will seem cursed.
21 They will build houses and live in them;
    
they will plant vineyards and eat their fruit.
22 They won’t build for others to live in,
    
nor plant for others to eat.
Like the days of a tree will be the days of my people;
    
my chosen will make full use of their handiwork.
23 They won’t labor in vain,
    
nor bear children to a world of horrors,
    
because they will be people blessed by the Lord,
    
they along with their descendants.
24 Before they call, I will answer;
    
while they are still speaking, I will hear.
25 Wolf and lamb will graze together,
    
and the lion will eat straw like the ox,
    
but the snake—its food will be dust.
They won’t hurt or destroy at any place on my holy mountain,
    
says the Lord.

Word of God, word of life. Thanks be to God.

GOSPEL:  John 14:18-31

A reading from: John

18 “I won’t leave you as orphans. I will come to you. 19 Soon the world will no longer see me, but you will see me. Because I live, you will live too. 20 On that day you will know that I am in my Father, you are in me, and I am in you. 21 Whoever has my commandments and keeps them loves me. Whoever loves me will be loved by my Father, and I will love them and reveal myself to them.”

22 Judas (not Judas Iscariot) asked, “Lord, why are you about to reveal yourself to us and not to the world?”

23 Jesus answered, “Whoever loves me will keep my word. My Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them. 24 Whoever doesn’t love me doesn’t keep my words. The word that you hear isn’t mine. It is the word of the Father who sent me.

25 “I have spoken these things to you while I am with you. 26 The Companion, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything and will remind you of everything I told you.

27 “Peace I leave with you. My peace I give you. I give to you not as the world gives. Don’t be troubled or afraid. 28 You have heard me tell you, ‘I’m going away and returning to you.’ If you loved me, you would be happy that I am going to the Father, because the Father is greater than me. 29 I have told you before it happens so that when it happens you will believe. 30 I won’t say much more to you because this world’s ruler is coming. He has nothing on me. 31 Rather, he comes so that the world will know that I love the Father and do just as the Father has commanded me. Get up. We’re leaving this place.

Word of God, word of life. Thanks be to God.

REFLECTION:

It is 4 weeks since Easter, and it’s only a week until Jesus will ascend to God. Our Gospel reading is part of the last evening Jesus has with the disciples. He is preparing them for the time when he will be gone from them. It’s a sort of farewell address, though the disciples don’t yet understand what is happening.

In this portion of the address, Jesus reminds them that he is one with the Father and they are, too. Repeatedly, Jesus focuses on God’s love here. The disciples are loved and so they are to love others just as God loves, so all people may know God’s love.

I suspect the disciples are beginning to be anxious, fearful by this time. Why are you talking of leaving us? And what will we do without you? But Jesus has a plan.


“I will not leave you alone, like orphans. I will send a Companion to be with you, the Holy Spirit. Spirit will teach you everything you need to know and will help you remember everything I taught you.”

… I am trying to put myself in the room with the disciples, as one of the women, Johanna, perhaps. Here is what is going through my mind: “I find I am confused and worried, even scared. Jesus has been such a powerful force in my life for years and I can’t imagine life without him. What does he mean he is leaving? Who will this Companion be? I am freaking out! My mind is in a whirl! … Then Jesus tries to calm us down with the word ‘Shalom. Peace.’ And I am able to take a breath and calm down a bit.”


… Shalom is a Hebrew word that means peace, but peace that implies more than a lack of war. It means divine peace, total, worldwide, all of creation, peace. One way of describing shalom is this: If there is a lack of shalom anywhere, there is no shalom everywhere.

As a world, as a country, as a community, we have certainly been lacking in shalom lately. We can make a list that includes local and global poiltics, the lack of respect by many people toward people of color, and everything that has been disrupted by COVID. And then we can add our own personal concerns and crises – things like a broken ankle or a congregation in transition awaiting its new pastor.

While only God can make shalom happen, we can work together to bring a sense of shalom to our little corner of the world. We can be kind to all people, inviting them and welcoming them among us. We can share God’s love by providing what they need, if we can do so – some socks or a bag of food. We can speak out against injustice, with letters to congresspersons or the newspaper, or in person as appropriate.

We can work to do what Jesus tells us to do here: as Jesus has loved us, so we are to love one another. Amen

SCRIPTURE DIALOGUE

Long ago God spoke to our ancestors in many and various ways by the prophets,         

but in these last days, God has spoken to us by the Son.

 

PRAYERS

In peace let us pray to the Lord, saying, “We pray to you, Lord.”

That this evening may be holy, good, and peaceful, We pray to you, Lord.

That the work we have done this day and the people we have met may bring us closer to you, We pray to you, Lord.

That we may be forgiven our sins and offences, We pray to you, Lord.

That we may hear and respond to your call to peace and justice, We pray to you, Lord.

That you will sustain the faith and hope of the weary, the lonely, and the oppressed, We pray to you, Lord.

That you will strengthen us in your service, and fill our hearts with longing for your kingdom, We pray to you, Lord.

 

Other prayer petitions may be offered here.

For all this and more, We pray to you, Lord. Amen.

 

LORD’S PRAYER

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever and ever. Amen.

 

HYMN:  Praise and Thanksgiving

YouTube link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3mMlJCbQzg&ab_channel=MaryRuth72

BLESSING

Christ is alive and has met us here.
Now let us meet God’s Spirit + among friends, strangers,
and in all of creation. Amen.

Scripture from Common English Bible © 2012

Liturgy from ELW Annual Liturgy License 26504 and Abingdon Worship Annual 2021

 

Sunday, May 2, 2021

Branches of the Vine

 Acts 8:26-40; John 15:1-8

While I grew up in the south suburbs of Chicago, I have a long connection with Michigan. My grandmother (Mormor) lived there so my family was in Michigan often. Then, after college, Jim (my ex) and I settled in southwest Michigan and raised our boys there. I often describe the area as a few small cities surrounded by corn fields, orchards, and vineyards.


At harvest time, the vines look like this, lush and green, loaded with fruit. For some grapes, the leaves are placed over the fruit clusters to protect them from the sun. Other grapes do best with more sunlight.

 

But before the new growing season, the vines are all pruned back. It seems cruel. But it is the best way to care for the vine and to have an abundant harvest each year. There is a skill to trimming grape vines, cutting back just enough and not too much. Grape vines grow whether we want them to or not; but they produce the best fruit if they are trimmed regularly, carefully.


This is what Jesus is talking about in today’s Gospel reading. Jesus is the vine, and we are the branches. Jesus wants us to stay connected to the vine; at the same time, he recognizes there may be times when we need to be trimmed, pruned, in order for us to be the healthiest branches.

We all have had experiences that have shaped us. Sometimes these experiences have helped us grow in faith, sometimes these experiences have turned us away from God. We have habits and attitudes learned from childhood, some of them good, some of them harmful to ourselves and others.


For example, one day at seminary in Chicago, I was walking to the grocery store a couple blocks away. As I looked toward the corner, I noticed a cluster of young black men in hoodies standing and talking on the corner. Just to be safe, I crossed the street before I got to the corner.

Was I being safe? Or was I exhibiting prejudice? This moment plays in my mind regularly to remind me that I have prejudices, and that I am not always proud of the way they make me act. I think of it as God’s way of pruning me. God’s pruning helps me remember that God loves young men in hoodies as much as God loves me.

… The Book of the Acts of the Apostles could easily, and perhaps more appropriately, be called the Acts of the Holy Spirit. It’s easy to see evidence of Spirit on every page. Today, we have the story of Philip and his encounter with an Ethiopian eunuch.


Philip is a deacon, a new order of church workers that arose when the first disciples learned they were not able to serve all the widows in town. We are more familiar with the name Stephen, a deacon, and the first believer to be killed for his faith in Jesus. Philip has been spreading the good news in Samaria, east and north of Jerusalem.  

The eunuch is on his way from Jerusalem back to Africa, by way of Gaza. We know a few things about him. We know his body is different, so most people would have seen him as imperfect, damaged. He is an official – so he has power, despite his lack of social power as a eunuch in the Roman Empire. He has the use of a chariot, so he is an important person in Ethiopia. He was in Jerusalem to worship, but he would have been prevented from entering the Jewish temple because his body was imperfect.


Here’s where Spirit enters the story. The eunuch happens to be traveling and reading the scroll of the Prophet Isaiah. Philip is nearby, thanks to Spirit, and Spirit says to Philip, go and join the man in the chariot. Philip joins the eunuch in the chariot and begins the conversation. “What are you reading, and do you understand it?” “No, I need someone to explain it to me.” So, Philip connects the dots between the scripture and Jesus and baptism.


They are on a wilderness road, going through the desert, but Spirit provides water! The eunuch sees the water and asks to be baptized right that minute. Philip does the baptism and then disappears, because Spirit needs him in Azotus, a city on the Mediterranean Sea. The eunuch takes the good news of Jesus’ resurrection and God’s grace to Africa where many come to believe because of this eunuch.

The book of Acts demonstrates that Spirit welcomes all people, even those who have traditionally been left out: women, foreigners, non-Jewish people, people of all ages and abilities and shapes and colors. It is because of people like the eunuch sharing the good news that Christianity spread around the world.


Jesus welcomes and loves all people – anyone who chooses to follow him is welcome. He offers himself to all people by extending a branch of the vine. All we have to do is grab onto it.

When you came in, you received a piece of grapevine. Notice that there are tendrils on the vine. They serve to seek out and maintain a hold on the fence or on other sections of the vine. These tendrils are so persistent that even detached from the fence, even though the vine is dead wood, the tendrils are designed to connect with something. That’s why each piece had to be in a separate bag, otherwise Julia would have had a challenge handing out just one piece of vine.

I think Jesus may be just as persistent in trying to keep a connection with us. He will grab on to us so he can love us and offer us mercy. He will remind us that we are his branches.

Let this piece of vine be a symbol for you, a reminder that you are connected to Jesus the Vine. Maybe this piece of vine can be a conversation starter, a way to talk about Jesus with someone who needs to know Jesus loves all people, no exceptions. It is through us, the branches, that the good news of Jesus’ resurrection and God’s grace continue to spread. It is with the tendrils that we make connections with each other and with God, connections that are quite hard to break.  Amen

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Evening Prayer for April 28

 04 28 2021

Evening Prayer (Vespers)

You may wish to light a candle and place it before you as you begin.

 

OPENING DIALOGUE

Answer us when we call, O God.
Be gracious to us and hear our prayer.
When we are in distress, you make space for us.
You put gladness in our hearts,
as with a fine feast.
When we are disturbed, may we not sin,
but ponder things on our beds, and be silent.
We will lie down and sleep in peace.
For you alone, O Lord, make us lie down
in safety.

HYMN: Thy Holy Wings

YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kW7YcUy-iEE

READINGS

FIRST READING: Micah 7:14-20 (CEV)

A reading from Micah

 

Lead your people, Lord! Come and be our shepherd. Grasslands surround us, but we live in a forest. So lead us to Bashan and Gilead, and let us find pasture as we did long ago. I, the Lord, will work miracles just as I did when I led you out of Egypt. Nations will see this and be ashamed because of their helpless armies. They will be in shock, unable to speak or hear, because of their fear of me, your Lord and God. Then they will come trembling, crawling out of their fortresses like insects or snakes, lapping up the dust.

The people said: Our God, no one is like you. We are all that is left of your chosen people, and you freely forgive our sin and guilt. You don’t stay angry forever; you’re glad to have pity and pleased to be merciful. You will trample on our sins and throw them in the sea. You will keep your word and be faithful to Jacob and to Abraham, as you promised our ancestors many years ago.

Word of God, word of life. Thanks be to God.

GOSPEL:  Mark 14:26-31 (CEV)

A reading from: Mark

 

Then they sang a hymn and went out to the Mount of Olives. Jesus said to his disciples, “All of you will reject me, as the Scriptures say, ‘I will strike down the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered.’

But after I am raised to life, I will go ahead of you to Galilee.” Peter spoke up, “Even if all the others reject you, I never will!” Jesus replied, “This very night before a rooster crows twice, you will say three times that you don’t know me.” But Peter was so sure of himself that he said, “Even if I have to die with you, I will never say that I don’t know you!” All the others said the same thing.

Word of God, word of life. Thanks be to God.

REFLECTION:



This is Mark’s version of when Jesus predicts Peter’s denial. They are among the olive trees on the Mount of Olives, outside the city. Notice that it is not just Peter who will reject him, but all of them. They will all scatter, like sheep without a shepherd scatter in fear.

 


Despite his professions that he won’t, Peter does deny that he knows Jesus. As soon as he heard the cock crow, he remembered the conversation, and he wept with grief and shame. Where are the disciples during the crucifixion? Not there. They are in hiding out of fear. They don’t trust enough to be seen by the Jews or the Romans.


Mark’s gospel doesn’t include stories of the resurrection beyond the women discovering the empty tomb. So, we need to look at other gospels. In this case, I was thinking about the story in John where Jesus charges Peter with loving the sheep.

This picture gives us the sense that Jesus takes Peter aside for a private conversation. Jesus makes it clear that Peter is forgiven. But we know human nature, and that for the rest of his life, Peter will be haunted by these denials. Jesus knows this, and wants Peter to know that he is really and truly forgiven.

In our own lives, there are always moments that we wish we could take back. There are things we have said, things we have done or failed to do, that bring shame to our hearts. They haunt us, and remind us we are sinful beings. We may even have encountered consequences for these regrets, these sins.


Jesus wants us to know that we are no different from Peter. We are forgiven; our hearts should let these regrets go, accept God’s grace, and be free of guilt and shame. Let’s believe in the promise Micah declares: God freely forgives our sin and guilt. God doesn’t stay angry forever; God is glad to have pity and pleased to be merciful. Amen


SCRIPTURE DIALOGUE

Long ago God spoke to our ancestors in many and various ways by the prophets,         

but in these last days, God has spoken to us by the Son.

 

PRAYERS

In peace let us pray to the Lord, saying, “We pray to you, Lord.”

That this evening may be holy, good, and peaceful, We pray to you, Lord.

That the work we have done this day and the people we have met may bring us closer to you, We pray to you, Lord.

That we may be forgiven our sins and offences, We pray to you, Lord.

That we may hear and respond to your call to peace and justice, We pray to you, Lord.

That you will sustain the faith and hope of the weary, the lonely, and the oppressed, We pray to you, Lord.

That you will strengthen us in your service, and fill our hearts with longing for your kingdom, We pray to you, Lord.

 

Other prayer petitions may be offered here.

For all this and more, We pray to you, Lord. Amen.

 

LORD’S PRAYER

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever and ever. Amen.

 

HYMN:  There Is a Balm in Gilead

YouTube link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZCMyhchbYI

BLESSING

Christ is alive and has met us here.
Now let us meet God’s Spirit + among friends, strangers,
and in all of creation. Amen.

Scripture from Common English Bible © 2012

Liturgy from ELW Annual Liturgy License 26504

 

Sunday, April 25, 2021

The Good Shepherd’s Hired Hand

 

04 25 2021

Acts 4:5-12; Psalm 23; 1 John 3:16-24; John 10:11-18

I spent some time this week learning about what modern shepherds do. Here is a little of what I learned. They make sure there is good grazing, including checking for harmful plants or animals. They watch for the health of their sheep, offering medical care as needed. They shear the sheep and prepare the wool for sale, or use it themselves. They haul sheep to market or auction. Of course, first they have to convince the sheep to get into the truck!


Often, shepherds help with lambing, as I found out in person.
My friend, one-time boss, classmate, and colleague, Cathi was a shepherd. I met Cathi at seminary, and worked with her at Women of the ELCA in Churchwide headquarters in Chicago.

I was moving from internship in Iowa to my new home in Michigan, and stayed at her place over night. First, she cooked dinner for us, and then we put on warm clothes and went out to the barn where a ewe was in labor. Cathi placed herself at the tail and told me to stand at the ewe’s head. In just a few minutes she was handing me a tiny lamb and a towel. “Here,” she said. “Dry him off while I catch his twin.” It was an unforgettable moment in my life.   


The image of God as shepherd is about as old as the Hebrew Bible. In Psalm 23, we see how well God takes care of us. God has called God’s people “God’s flock,” and does everything possible to keep us well-fed and safe.   

Jesus claims this familiar image for God for himself. “I am the Good Shepherd,” he says. “You are so important to me that I willingly give up my life so you may live well. I care for you much better than a hired hand does.”   

I read a lot of commentary this week about the term “hired hand”. I suspect most, if not all of us, have had our times of being the hired hand. And we have given our particular assignments the best we had to offer. Honesty and speed as a grocery cashier. Accuracy as a factory assembler. Thoroughness as a lawn mower. And so forth. We were well-respected hired hands.


I also suspect we have known people who did as little as possible at whatever job they had. They always had something else to do. The boss picked on them. The equipment was busted. And so forth. They were the type of hired hands Jesus is referring to. They will not protect the sheep from the wolves; instead, they will run away at the slightest sign of danger.

In John’s first letter to his congregation, he makes it clear that Jesus is about love. Jesus laid down his life for us, and we should be willing to do the same in return. The way we behave should be a reflection of our awareness of Jesus’ love for us. John doesn’t put it this way, but we could say that we aren’t supposed to act like the hired hands who run away. If we have the ability to help someone in need, it’s our job to do so.

When followers of Jesus work to make life better for any members of the flock, they are more than hired hands. They are even more than good Hired Hands. They are called by name through their baptism to be God’s hands and feet and mouths for God’s purposes on earth. So, maybe we could say they are God’s Called Hands.

What kind of things might God’s Called Hands do? At St Matthew’s, of course, we would continue to feed hungry people. We would continue to provide hygiene items and toiletries to people in need in the area. We would continue to welcome all people into our midst. Assuming COVID permits, we would continue to invite our neighbors to know Jesus at the Live Nativity.

God’s Called Hands are always looking for more ways to show Jesus’ love. For example, here is a story.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brzjeICcIt0

[Video summary: The most compassionate pizza shop invites those who have the funds to pre-pay for a slice to feed someone who can’t pay for it.]


Jesus loves us as a Good Shepherd loves all the sheep in the flock. We are not hired hands who run away when the wolf appears. We are God’s Called Hands, called to serve God’s people with love, because we have been loved first. We are called to love, as we also have been loved.

Amen

 

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Evening Prayer for April 21

 

04 21 2021

Evening Prayer (Vespers)

You may wish to light a candle and place it before you as you begin.

 

OPENING DIALOGUE

Answer us when we call, O God.
Be gracious to us and hear our prayer.
When we are in distress, you make space for us.
You put gladness in our hearts,
as with a fine feast.
When we are disturbed, may we not sin,
but ponder things on our beds, and be silent.
We will lie down and sleep in peace.
For you alone, O Lord, make us lie down
in safety.

HYMN: Let all things now living

YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2BrrTk1T8k

READINGS

PSALM:  Psalm 150

1Hallelujah! Praise God in the holy temple;

     praise God in the mighty firmament.

2Praise God for mighty acts;

     praise God for exceeding greatness.

3Praise God with trumpet sound;

     praise God with lyre and harp.

4Praise God with tambourine and dance;

     praise God with strings and pipe.

5Praise God with resounding cymbals;

     praise God with loud clanging cymbals.

6Let everything that has breath

     praise the LORD. Hallelujah!

 

GOSPEL:  Mark 16:9-18

A reading from:  Mark

9 Very early on the first day of the week, after Jesus had risen to life, he appeared to Mary Magdalene. Earlier he had forced seven demons out of her. 10 She left and told his friends, who were crying and mourning. 11 Even though they heard that Jesus was alive and that Mary had seen him, they would not believe it.

12 Later, Jesus appeared in another form to two disciples, as they were on their way out of the city. 13 But when these disciples told what had happened, the others would not believe.

14 Afterwards, Jesus appeared to his eleven disciples as they were eating. He scolded them because they were too stubborn to believe the ones who had seen him after he had been raised to life. 15 Then he told them: Go and preach the good news to everyone in the world. 16 Anyone who believes me and is baptized will be saved. But anyone who refuses to believe me will be condemned.  17 Everyone who believes me will be able to do wonderful things. By using my name they will force out demons, and they will speak new languages. 18 They will handle snakes and will drink poison and not be hurt. They will also heal sick people by placing their hands on them.

Word of God, word of life. Thanks be to God.

REFLECTION:

This portion of Mark, verses 9-18, is usually marked as doubtful. Even in the second century, some ancient authorities said they thought it should not be included. Others say it definitely should be there. The language is different, giving a summary of events instead of telling the story as the rest of Mark does. One thought is that the last page of authentic / original Mark went missing and scribes who were making copies added something from another source just to complete the story.

We usually say Mark ends at Chapter 16 verse 8. The women fled from the empty tomb, in fear and amazement. But, tonight we have a chance to explore these questionable verses, often called The Longer Ending of Mark.


These verses describe the disciples’ response to the news that Jesus had been raised from the dead. The first little comment has Mary Magdalene going to the tomb and Jesus appears to her. But the disciples heard her report, they would not believe it.


The second little report is of the two Emmaus disciples. Jesus reveals himself to them. But when they return to the rest of the disciples, there is again a refusal to believe.

 

 


The third and longer story has Jesus revealing himself to the eleven disciples. Jesus scolds them for their lack of faith and their stubborn refusal to believe the reports given by others who had seen him already.

After this rebuke he commissions them to go into all the world and preach the good news. Those who believe will be saved; those who do not believe will not be saved. Those who believe will have the power to cast out demons, to speak in new languages, and they will lay hands on the sick and they will be healed. I am intentionally omitting the part about snake handling and poison, since many have died believing Jesus would protect them in any and all circumstances.  


In brief, this passage has one message for us: we should believe that Jesus has been raised from the dead and our belief should send us to all the world with this extremely good news. This belief in Jesus should fill us with the excitement, the passion, to tell others that God is more powerful than death.

And it should fill us with the belief that when we tell others about Jesus, he will help our listeners to hear us, so they can also come to believe. In this way, one day, the good news will spread to all the world. Amen

SCRIPTURE DIALOGUE

Long ago God spoke to our ancestors in many and various ways by the prophets,         

but in these last days, God has spoken to us by the Son.

 

PRAYERS

In peace let us pray to the Lord, saying, “We pray to you, Lord.”

That this evening may be holy, good, and peaceful, We pray to you, Lord.

That the work we have done this day and the people we have met may bring us closer to you, We pray to you, Lord.

That we may be forgiven our sins and offences, We pray to you, Lord.

That we may hear and respond to your call to peace and justice, We pray to you, Lord.

That you will sustain the faith and hope of the weary, the lonely, and the oppressed, We pray to you, Lord.

That you will strengthen us in your service, and fill our hearts with longing for your kingdom, We pray to you, Lord.

 

Other prayer petitions may be offered here.

For all this and more, We pray to you, Lord. Amen.

 

LORD’S PRAYER

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever and ever. Amen.

 

HYMN:  Christ has arisen, alleluia

YouTube link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPsFTZfR91I

BLESSING

Christ is alive and has met us here.
Now let us meet God’s Spirit + among friends, strangers,
and in all of creation. Amen.

Scripture from Common English Bible © 2012

Liturgy from ELW Annual Liturgy License 26504

And Worship Annual 2021